Posts tagged Creativity

Recapturing Your Creative Spirit by C. McNair Wilson


C. McNair Wilson lives his life at the confluence of faith and art, a bustling intersection these days. McNair — a San Francisco Bay Area resident — has worked professionally as actor, director, teacher, playwright, Disney Imagineer, coach to public speakers and corporate executives, author, cartoonist, magician, and ventriloquist (retired).

McNair travels the world (33 countries) and has performed his two one-man plays, The Fifth Gospel and From Up Here at colleges, conferences, and churches of every flavor. He has taught his trademark IMAGINUITYTM process (now on video) for clients as diverse as IBM & the Salvation Army.

Is Consumerism Killing Our Creativity?

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Great article from www.the99percent.com.

Have you ever fallen into a black hole of comparison shopping? You’re looking for a new digital camera, for instance. You head over to Cnet.com and read some reviews of various cameras, watch the video demos, identify the model you want. Then perhaps you employ Google’s shopping search to price out the options and find the best deal. All of the sudden, it’s four hours later. You’ve found the perfect camera, but your purchasing triumph is tainted by a creeping feeling of, well, disgust. Couldn’t that time have been used better?

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C.S. Lewis on Writing

From the website Letters of Note:

Considering he wrote The Chronicles of Narnia, one of the most popular collections of children’s literature of all time, it’s no real surprise that C. S. Lewis received thousands of letters from youngsters during his career. What’s admirable is that he attempted to reply to each and every one of those pieces of fan mail, and not just with a generic, impersonal line or two.

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Ira Glass On Creativity (or, The Gap Between Our Taste And Our Work…)

Ira Glass of PRI’s This American Life talks about creativity, and absolutely kills it (via these wonderful transcriptions from the Design Talk blog):

“What nobody tells people who are beginners — and I really wish someone had told this to me . . . is that all of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, and it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not.”

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